Chad Perrin: SOB

29 January 2009

What do I like about Firefox 3?

Filed under: Geek,Mezilla — apotheon @ 01:28

I’ve been using Firefox 3 for a while now. I have to ask:

Why?

Nothing comes to mind as a reason to use Firefox 3 instead of Firefox 2. What are the benefits? Is there something it does for me that I just don’t remember is lacking in Firefox 2?

I know version 3 was supposed to make things faster and more stable and so on, but from what I’ve seen . . . it doesn’t. It’s just bigger, and its “awesome bar” violates the POLS. Please, tell me why I’m using Firefox 3 instead of Firefox 2.

Is version 2 still getting security updates?

. . . and what the hell is taking so long getting Chromium ported to Linux? Once it gets to Linux, maybe it’ll get ported more quickly to FreeBSD (where it belongs, being a mostly-BSD-licensed Web browser anyway).

7 Comments

  1. As I think Firefox 3 is really shaping up with some pretty cool new features being implemented in the recent months. That’s not including the cool FUEL (Firefox User Extension Library) JavaScript library that promises to make extension development a bajillion times more productive, Places for data storage, and the use of Cairo for graphics.

    Comment by Golf Equipment — 30 January 2009 @ 12:15

  2. I’ll be happy when Firefox will support MNG‘s once again. I’d like to be able to use them instead of GIFs.

    Comment by Joseph A. Nagy, Jr. — 30 January 2009 @ 08:00

  3. I’m going to go ahead and agree with you on the Firefox 3 topic. The only benefit I can see as of now is the more modern look. Other than that it doesn’t really do anything for me.

    Comment by Lacrosse Facts — 2 February 2009 @ 10:23

  4. Ok, so remember how firefox 2 had the restore session option after not closing it correctly?

    well for some reason, when i do the startup after closing firefox 3 suddenly, the option doesn’t come up and it doesnt restore my previous session.

    lately it’s become a habit and it sucks cuz i had about 10 tabs open at one time.

    is there any way to fix this so i can use the “restore previous session” option again?

    thx

    Comment by Erotic Massage — 4 March 2009 @ 11:43

  5. There’s a browser I didn’t see in your list. Maybe I missed it.

    Are you familiar with Trolltech’s Webkit?

    In QT they included a code sample for a web browser.

    A few people have made use of that code sample and developed on it. One project is aimed at Windows and is simply called “QTBrowser”. I think there’s another one or two hosted on Google Code.

    These are not “do everything” browsers, but they share Webkit’s (and hence Safari’s) good reputation for rendering. Appearance of webpages seems to be important for lots of people, maybe even more than content.

    Perhaps more interestingly, at least with QTBrowser, relative to the other rendering-focused graphical browsers, it’s small (e.g. 4-7MB), quick and efficient with memory usage.

    For anyone obsessed with rendering but also tired of the big graphical browsers, you might look at the QT Webkit sample code.

    I’d be perfectly content if javascript did not exist. It just doesn’t seem necessary (except to keep some people employed). I guess that’s what happens when you stop using it for a year.

    Comment by argv — 17 July 2009 @ 06:23

  6. One more thing, I notice in FF3 their Google Search bar that’s in there by default will pop up “suggested search terms”. These terms obviously are top earners in ad revenue for Google. I wonder what sort of “cut” Firefox is getting for putting that search bar in there?

    It’s easy to say, “yeah, but it’s useful”. But eventually, these decisions get to a point where they are not being driven by what’s most useful to users, they are being driven by what brings in the most revenue. For Google!, for the advertisers, and for Mozilla. Regardless of how they use the revenue (profit/non-profit), they want more of it, and users come second.

    Having the Google search bar there is one thing. It’s debatable whether that’s necessary, but I can ignore it. But do we really need suggested search terms? When I see those pop up, I see the motives behind it, and I have a hard time seeing how Firefox is much different from Internet Explorer. They seem to care more about is beating each other, and market share, than anything else.

    Maybe it’s just too difficult to stay focused on the important things when an organisation grows past a certain size. Too many interests to serve. All those people on the Mozilla payroll for one. I’ve seen better work from volunteer projects where no one was paid anything.

    Comment by argv — 17 July 2009 @ 06:43

  7. In QT they included a code sample for a web browser.

    I try to avoid installing Qt on my laptop. I’d try to avoid installing GTK+, as well, but it’s pretty much unavoidable (especially if I want a multiprotocol IM client with OTR support on an open source operating system).

    This, along with the fact it just sucks (as a Web browser), is a big reason I don’t use Konqueror (though I suppose it’s okay as a point-and-click GUI filesystem browser, if you’re into that sort of thing).

    Perhaps more interestingly, at least with QTBrowser, relative to the other rendering-focused graphical browsers, it’s small (e.g. 4-7MB), quick and efficient with memory usage.

    Does it provide any benefits over using something like Dillo, to help offset the fact it drags Qt along with it?

    Regardless of how they use the revenue (profit/non-profit), they want more of it, and users come second.

    That could definitely be a problem for a poorly-enough disciplined organization so that it caves in to those kinds of pressures. I imagine Mozilla will head more and more in that direction, given time.

    I have a hard time seeing how Firefox is much different from Internet Explorer.

    Well . . . for one thing, it’s available as a native application on FreeBSD. For another, the source is open. I see your point, though.

    Maybe it’s just too difficult to stay focused on the important things when an organisation grows past a certain size.

    That’s just one reason among many that I believe incorporation as a legal convention for businesses is a scourge on the face of the socioeconomic world.

    Comment by apotheon — 18 July 2009 @ 04:21

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