Chad Perrin: SOB

14 March 2007

Visitor Demographics

Filed under: Geek,Metalog — apotheon @ 02:16

Over the course of the last two days, these statistics have been collected about you, my readers:

BrowserVisits
Firefox635
Internet Explorer (not 7.0)67
Internet Explorer 7.041
Safari51
Mozilla46
Opera36
Others24


PlatformVisits
Windows XP478
Windows 200035
Windows Vista22
Other Windows16
Linux179
MacOS Intel84
MacOS PPC63
FreeBSD19
Others4


Visitor TypeVisitsPages/Visit
New Visitors8261.16
Returning Visitors741.69


During the last couple days, my most popular page has been the One Important Factor of programming languages, and most of those visits have been from programming.reddit.com. None of them clicked on any ads.

Draw your own conclusions, today. It’s just a two-day sample — obviously, not statistically significant. That’ll take more time.

8 Comments

  1. I don’t know what days you pulled your sample from, but I’m willing to bet a fair amount of your IE 7 hits have come from me, using my work laptop.

    And now that I’ve been using it for a while, I have to say that IE 7 is by far the most usable and stable version of IE ever. Which may not be saying much, except that now, functionally, I find it indistinguishable from Firefox. But I also don’t take advantage of some of Firefox’s advanced features (such as plug-ins).

    Comment by Brian Martinez — 14 March 2007 @ 03:51

  2. I’ve noticed that IE7 seems to be much better at CSS in general, but it manages to very mysteriously screw up some XHTML+CSS stuff that IE6 did not.

    The functionality of IE7, bugs and standards support issues aside, is much improved over earlier versions of IE. I must agree with you on that. I prefer the better standards support of Firefox still, though, and I actually use a few plugins. For instance, I’m using both a Google PageRank display for the current page and a Google AdSense progress tracker plugin.

    I also find that the manner in which the toolbars at the top are arranged and customizable is for the most part preferable in Firefox over the same in IE, though that’s mostly a matter of taste I suppose. There are some things that I prefer about the toolbar customizability in IE, but not enough to overcome my more Firefox-oriented preferences for the toolbars.

    Thanks for the information about your browser use here and your take on IE7’s functionality. I rather suspect that my SigO also contributes to the IE7 visits here.

    edit: The dates for the stats were Monday and Tuesday of this week.

    Comment by apotheon — 14 March 2007 @ 04:16

  3. “I rather suspect that my SigO also contributes to the IE7 visits here.”

    After I found out that SigO wasn’t some obscure hacker or programming reference (at first thought it might have been Sig() instead, and thus lead me down the computer path), I can say that I have contributed to a portion of the IE 7 visits on your site.

    I have to use IE at work since the product I support only runs on Internet Explorer. Well, that last statement isn’t fully true; I’ve tested the software and it seems to work just fine on Firefox with the IE Tab add-on. In fact, IE 7 broke some functionality within the software, but it still works fine in Firefox. I haven’t had much luck convincing people here at work to use Firefox instead of IE.

    As for IE 7, I’ve found that it seems to crash unexpectedly and I’ve had problems with web applications that used to work fine in IE 6. We use Microsoft SharePoint Services and I now have trouble with it hanging when trying to sort or filter entries in it. It also always prompts me for a login and won’t save the information, whereas I had no problem in IE 6. If I use Firefox, I also don’t have the problems with it.

    The tab feature is nice, so I don’t have to have a ton of windows open at once, so it is handy that they finally added that feature. The RSS feed feature is useless (unless I just don’t know how to use it properly) because you have to go to the site instead of getting a list so I can just quickly look through like I do when using it in Firefox. I also dislike the fact that you can’t move the navigation buttons around in IE 7. They have them spread out all over the place and I still have a hard time finding the Stop and Refresh buttons.

    Another complaint about IE 7 is the fact that when you install it, it changes all of your settings for the browser and you have to reconfigure them. It also changed the look of the font, not just in IE but all of Windows, when I upgraded to IE 7.

    Anyway, there’s my opinion on IE 7. I’m actually writing this from Firefox instead of IE, so I’m not adding to your numbers today. Maybe I should just migrate all of my work over here since everything I use seems to work better in Firefox even though it is designed to work in IE.

    Comment by medullaoblongata — 15 March 2007 @ 10:37

  4. I haven’t had much luck convincing people here at work to use Firefox instead of IE.

    I’m not entirely certain why, but that made me crack up. Actually, most of your comment up to this point was similarly amusing, but that was really the cherry on top.

    Your laundry list of issues with IE7 is in general pretty disheartening. You’re using it on IE6 — right? I wonder what OS version Brian’s using. Brian, if you’re reading this, please let me know — and let me know if you’re suffering any of the same problems medullaoblongata has. I’d like to know how common this crashiness and so on actually is.

    Anyway, there’s my opinion on IE 7. I’m actually writing this from Firefox instead of IE, so I’m not adding to your numbers today. Maybe I should just migrate all of my work over here since everything I use seems to work better in Firefox even though it is designed to work in IE.

    There’s another amusing statement about it. Maybe this is just my biases (which you seem to like to identify for me) showing through, but the irony of that is really entertaining.

    Comment by apotheon — 15 March 2007 @ 12:20

  5. “You’re using it on IE6 — right?”

    I’m guessing you meant to say “Windows XP” instead? If so, then yes, that’s what OS I have at work.

    I’d really like to take a crack at Windows Vista so I can see all the new things it breaks.

    Comment by medullaoblongata — 15 March 2007 @ 02:27

  6. Err, yes, Windows XP. I had a brain fart.

    Comment by apotheon — 15 March 2007 @ 05:51

  7. I use XP Pro. And like medullaoblongata, I have to support our applications on IE, although most of our end users are probably still using IE 6. However, given that it’s an ASP.NET application, there’s no reason why it shouldn’t work on Firefox as well – I just haven’t tested it because our IT department has made it pretty clear that they don’t want non-IE browsers on corporate machines. I have a feeling that developers could break that rule if we really wanted to, but there’s no real incentive.

    But generally it’s been as stable as anything else running on XP Pro, which is one of the more stable versions of Windows (Win2K is still probably the stability champ for desktop versions of Windows).

    And I’ve beta-tested Vista. I wouldn’t recommend running it unless you have a very powerful machine, one that’s been built in, say, the past six months. At the very least you need a 2 GHz processor and 2 GB of memory, and a newer Nvidia/ATI card. The built-in Intel chips common on laptops won’t cut it, at least if you want to run the Aero visual goodies.

    Comment by Brian Martinez — 15 March 2007 @ 09:10

  8. I agree with your assessment — that Win2k has tended to be more stable than WinXP, and is probably the most stable Windows release from Microsoft to date.

    Speaking of Vista . . .

    Yesterday, a friend told me that someone once described his “Vista emulator” to him, and this is how you can create your own “Vista emulator”:

    1. Remove half the RAM from your machine.
    2. Underclock your processor by about 1GHz.
    3. Turn up all the fancy eye-candy crap on XP.

    Congratulations! Not only do you get Vista emulation for free, but you have some extra RAM to play with and your processor runs cooler!

    Of course, if you want real Vista emulation, you should throw your “extra” RAM away and remove the fan and heat sink from your processor.

    Comment by apotheon — 16 March 2007 @ 11:03

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

All original content Copyright Chad Perrin: Distributed under the terms of the Open Works License